When is dentistry not medicine? When insurance is involved

When is dentistry not medicine? When insurance is involved

I’m 61 years old, a San Francisco homeowner with an academic caste at the University of California-Berkeley, which provides me with exhaustive health insurance. Yet, to open the more than $50,000 in out-of-pocket expenditures required for the restorative dental effort I’ve needed in the past 20 times, I’ve had to rely on handouts — from my mom.

This was how I learned all about the Great Divide between medicine and dentistry — especially in how therapy is paid for, or chiefly not paid for, by insurers. Countless Americans with serious dental illness find out the same mode: sticker shock.

For millions of Americans — ordained in various measures with good genes and good luck — dental insurance wields pretty well, and they don’t envisage much about it. But parties like me discover the hard way that dental coverage isn’t insurance at all — not in the sense of affording significant be protected against unexpected or unaffordable penalties. My dental coverage from UC-Berkeley, where I have been on the public health and journalism departments, exceeds out at $1,500 a year — and that’s considered a reasonable plan.

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